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Beamed energy if used right can save humans from some of the most devastating storms our planet has. Simply by redirecting the beamed energy to the center of hurricanes, the eye of the storm, we can lessen the strength or kill a hurricane. In the eye of a hurricane it's low pressure area is colder than the surrounding area, simply heating up the eye of a storm will diffuse the hurricane from forming and gaining strength.


Proposal to Beam Untapped and Hard to Transport Energy to Any Location on Earth

Any renewable or nonrenewable energy source may be used as Beamed Energy. Several different beamed energy sources will be tested such as visible light waves, microwave, or radio waves to find the safest and most cost efficient way to beam the energy from one place to another. We are also testing a new parabolic reflective umbrella type reflective mirror made from thin-film highly reflective Mylar for use in a solar concentrator using either sterling engines or solar concentrator cells. 

Investors help me build the worlds first true Beamed Energy test project

E-mail me at ron@shineinnovations.com or theinnovator@cox.net

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This partial abstract written in 2004 refers to wasted natural gas as a beamed energy source for full paper see:

http://members.cox.net/theinnovator/Beamed%20Energy%20Paper%205-07-12-04.7.pdf


By Ron Bennett
                                                    Abstract

By turning energy into light waves using a gas or solid state laser, we could beam the energy to a parabolic dish stationed in geostationary orbit (a point above the earth that the satellite will always be directly above). The dish would refocus the laser light and beam it back to a customer on earth. By doing this we can process the energy at the source and remove the cost of transporting it to the customer. It will help reduce the loss of vented global warming gas into the atmosphere from most natural gas sites.

Introduction 

Our country vents, or flares off, over ten-million tons of natural gas each year into the atmosphere from oil wells, coalmines, and landfills. There are over one million miles of gas pipelines that serves the US. Processing natural gas and transporting it overland looses over thirteen percent by volume to the atmosphere in transit. This adds to the amount of global warming gas released into the air. Over the last two hundred years the amount of methane in the atmosphere has doubled. Sixty percent of this increase was due to human activity. Methane gas makes up as much as ninety percent of the gas in natural gas. Methane is a global warming gas that traps as much as twenty two times more heat than CO2. "Controlling methane emissions would reduce both global warming and air pollution according to research at Harvard University, the Argonne National Laboratory, and the Environmental Protection Agency." American Geophysical Union reprinted in Science Daily.  

Over 90 percent of the Natural gas used in the US is domestically produced. Biomass production is turning plant and waist products into methane. Methane is also being recovered from sanitary landfills. There is a relative small amount of pollutants in natural gas after recovering it from the ground, as a result there is no need for pollution control equipment to remove the contaminates before using it for energy. Burning natural gas gives off 50 percent less CO2 than coal and 30 percent less than oil. h

http://members.cox.net/theinnovator/Beamed%20Energy%20Paper%205-07-12-04.7.pdf

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Below is a rendered drawing that shows how a space elevator may work using beamed energy.


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Solar concentrator using up to 1,000 suns per solar cell, will dramatically cut cost of solar arrays for space travel making them competitive with nuclear propulsion as cost of energy per kilogram.

Spectrolab